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Sports Vision Training

SPORTS VISION TRAINING MAND

What is Sports Vision Training:

The ability to integrate vision, movement, balance, coordination, gross visual-motor, fine visual-motor that will result in movement efficiency.  It is needed now more than ever because of technology.

What is the difference between a good athlete & an ELITE athlete?

How well their eyes, balance and coordination sync together under pressure.

Great sports vision takes practice. How good is your depth perception? How optimal is your peripheral vision? How well can your eyes hold focus? Do you see better with one eye?

If you want to be quicker, stronger and better at EVERYTHING, Read on!!

TEXT “sports vision” to 781-424-0488 for a discount code for your sports vision assessment

Sports Vision Laser Training

Sports Vision Laser Training

Move better stronger faster.  If you are seeing well, you are moving well.  Just because you have perfect vision from 20 feet away (Snelling chart) doesn’t mean you are seeing well at closer or farther distances.

Sports vision training is the difference at every level, during every practice, tryout and game!

–Mary Kim-Garrity

Cam is a college Lacrosse goalie. After 2 sessions of Sports Vision Training, his save percentage went from 65% to 73%. He lead his team to their league championships. Cam is an ALL-American Athlete this year.

John is a hockey player in his 40’s. He wears glasses and his peripheral vision was impaired.  Working with just his peripheral vision, he said “I feel like I skate faster and my legs don’t feel as heavy!” John’s brain was slowing him down because he wasn’t seeing well enough to move faster.  

Jeremy is a college sprinter. After he started sports vision training with Mary, he cut 3/10ths of a second off of his 100 meter fastest time. Enough to break his college’s record and become an ALL-American.

Luke is a hockey goalie who had a severe concussion. His vision was impaired (light transition, depth perception and convergence) due to the concussion. After SVT with Mary, all three skills improved from below 50% of capacity to over 90%. And the biggest thing he notes “My headaches went away!” Luke also led his team to the league championships and beyond.

BOOK HERE

http://www.secure-booker.com/ZenDen/BookOnlineStart.aspx?TreatmentID=2273590

A recent study of Olympic athletes showed:

  • 30% of athletes had less than 20/20 vision
  • 25% of athletes had decreased depth perception
  • 26% of athletes had poor eye-hand coordination for the demands of their sport
  • 12% of athletes had inaccurate eye movement abilities (ex: able to keep their eyes on the ball)

Imagine if you had only one of the deficits listed above. Now imagine the ability to improve that deficit through an easy to follow sports vision training program, which can be done at home and/or in office.

Basic Visual Skills

  1. Eye Movement Control-Do your eyes move well together in all directions. If not, your balance and focus can be compromised, even for a second. In the case of sports, that could mean losing your balance, losing the trajectory of the ball or puck
  2. Simultaneous Focus in Far vision-Do your eyes see equally well from afar and adjust accordingly. If not, you could lose sight of your target or miss your target because of that deficit.
  3. Sustaining Focus at Far vision-If you cannot sustain equal focus, you could lose your balance and target at the same time.
  4. Simultaneous Focus in Near vision-Do your eyes see equally well in near vision and adjust accordingly. If not, you could lose sight of your target or miss your target because of that deficit. Including staying together on the same word in reading.
  5. Sustaining Focus at Near-If you cannot sustain equal focus, you could lose your balance and target at the same time.
  6. Simultaneous Alignment at Far-Your eyes should be able to stay aligned to maintain the full spectrum of your far vision.  If not, your brain will not trust the image. This could result in limited mobility, balance and strength.
  7. Sustaining Alignment at Far-If your eyes lack the endurance to sustain this alignment sudden limitation in mobility, balance and strength can occur.
  8. Simultaneous Alignment at Near-Your eyes should be able to stay aligned to maintain the full spectrum of your near vision.  If not, your brain will not trust the image. This could result in limited mobility, balance and strength.
  9. Sustaining Alignment at Near-If your eyes lack the endurance to sustain this alignment sudden limitation in mobility, balance and strength can occur.
  10. Central Vision (Visual Acuity)-Eye test from 20 feet away.
  11. Peripheral Vision-Defined as everything that you see, that you are not looking at.  Huge in sports performance training.
  12. Depth Awareness-One of the most vital skills of the eye. If the eyes cannot maintain focus and alignment on a focal point, the object can appear closer or farther than they really are.  Double vision can occur and accuracy will be reduced significantly.
  13. Color Perception-Color is extremely subjective but vital to performance.  If you cannot distinguish colors, you may not be able to distinguish the objects that are on the path you are running on.
  14. Gross Visual-Motor-Sports vision coordinated while moving running, jumping, leaping etc.
  15. Fine Visual-Motor-Sports vision coordinated while looking for accuracy/precision
  16. Visual Perception-Sports vision and coordination with brain to produce an accurate picture
  17. Visual Integration-The ability to integrate sports vision, movement, balance, coordination, gross visual-motor, fine visual-motor that will result in movement efficiency.
  18. Eye-Hand Coordination – the ability to more accurately use your eye to direct the movements of our hands/body therefore increasing reaction time.
  19. Dynamic Visual Acuity – acuity while object is in motion
  20. Contrast Vision – sharpness of vision in a variety of lighting conditions
  21. Tracking of objects in motion – increased ability to “keep your eye on the ball”
  22. Increased peripheral vision – increased ability to see things “out of the corner of your eye”
  23. Visualization – the ability to see an object in motion and anticipate where it will be even before the object gets there
  24. Increased awareness of depth perception – the ability to quickly judge the distance and speed of an object (baseball, tennis ball, etc)
  25. Stronger focusing – this is the ability to change focus from one object to another in a quick and concise manner

As an Athletic Trainer, it is vital to assess all of these skills in my athletes.  I have worked with some of the best professional and D-1 College quarterbacks, goalies, basketball players, tennis players and baseball pitchers and this work is vital to their performance. It is also vital in any injury rehabilitation.–Mary Kim-Garrity

Sports Vision Assessment Includes

75 minutes

1. Visual Acuity – This is the score given to measure the athlete’s visual acuity. It is the number just below each player’s name at the top of the graph. Perfect vision is 20/20. Any results higher than 20/20, should be seen for a comprehensive eye exam to determine if vision can be corrected to 20/20.

2. Contrast (Vision) Visual Acuity – {Sharpness of vision}, ability of the eyes to pick up clear and concise detailed vision in order to discriminate differences. For example, contrast visual acuity allows the player to see the ball in any type of weather/lighting condition making it easier to the speed of a pitch.

3. Dynamic Visual Acuity – Ability to maintain sharp vision of an object in motion while it moves from point A to point B.

4. Eye Alignment – Measures proper alignment of the athletes’ eyes. Alignment of the eyes is important because it affects all areas of the visual system.

5. Eye Tracking – Ability of the eyes to track an object in motion, without any visual interruptions. Catching a line drive requires speed and accurate judgment of where and when the ball can be caught.

6. Depth Perception – Ability of the eyes to see objects in all three dimensions. This is important for catching a fly ball because seeing and understanding how high, and with what type of speed the ball is traveling requires that visual perception and information processing work together to direct the player to a position that will allow him to make the catch.

7. Peripheral Vision – ability to see without looking directly at a particular object. For instance, a pitcher needs to have good peripheral vision to keep track of any base runners taking a lead to steal. Or in relation to a catcher, his peripheral vision allows him to focus directly on catching the pitch, while still maintaining visual awareness of the runner on first.

8. Hand-Eye-Coordination – Ability of eyes to control movement of the body and hands, in response to stimuli. At the plate, the ability to see the pitch well enough to make contact is only part of the equation. The ability of the player to increase his or her hand-eye coordination increases the success with which each swing does or does not make contact with the ball.

9. Visualization – ability to anticipate where an object in motion will land, and respond to that anticipation with 100% accuracy. Visualization is a technique that enhances the athlete’s ability to accurately “anticipate” the direction of a ball in motion increasing the player’s odds of making the catch.

10. Focus Recovery – Ability to focus and relax the focusing muscle quickly and accurately. The focusing muscle must be strong enough to relax and contract (contract for viewing smaller objects and relax to focus on larger objects) several hundred times during a game. Eye fatigue will result in poor performance. Additionally, fatigue can also lead to headaches and “sore” eyes.

11. Visual Memory – Ability to recall visual images and stimuli. For instance, visual memory is need to study and recall a pitcher’s hand motions, as they relate to the type of pitch he will throw. Increased visual memory increases the chances that the athlete will be able to respond to the recalled memory with increased speed and accuracy.

12. Visual Spatial Awareness – ability to understand where your body is in space. For example, an outfielder uses visual spatial awareness of where he is in relation to the warning track. This way he is confident to maintain visual contact with the ball, instead of worrying that he will run into the wall or fence.

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